Domestic and Intimate Partner Violence - Parkside Police Department, Parkside, Pennsylvania

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Domestic and Intimate Partner Violence

Domestic violence and abuse, also called intimate partner violence, when one person purposely causes either physical or mental harm to another, including:

  • physical abuse
  • psychological or emotional abuse
  • sexual assault
  • isolation
  • Controlling all of the victim’s money, shelter, time, food, etc.

Often, the violent person is a husband, former husband, boyfriend, or ex-boyfriend, but sometimes the abuser is female. Domestic violence and abuse are common and must be taken very seriously.

This very common problem should be taken very seriously. One in four women report that they have been physically assaulted or raped by an intimate partner. These crimes occur in both heterosexual and same-sex relationships. The consequences of intimate partner violence can be devastating to women. Physical and emotional trauma can lead to increased stress, depression, lowered self-esteem, and post-traumatic stress disorder (an emotional state of discomfort and stress associated with the memories of a disturbing event).

Violence against women by any one is always wrong, whether the abuser is a current or past spouse, boyfriend, or girlfriend; someone you date; a family member; an acquaintance; or a stranger. You are not at fault. You did not cause the abuse to occur, and you are not responsible for the violent behavior of someone else. If you or someone you know has been a victim of intimate partner violence, seek help from other family members and friends or community organizations. Make sure you and your children are SAFE. Reach out for support or counseling. Talk with a health care provider, especially if you have been physically hurt. Learn more about how to get help for intimate partner or domestic violence. Another important part of getting help is knowing if you are in an abusive relationship. There are clear signs to help you know if you are being abused.

Dating Violence

Dating violence is when one person purposely causes physical or psychological harm to another person they are dating, including sexual assault, physical abuse, and psychological/emotional abuse. It is a serious crime that occurs in both casual and serious relationships, and in both heterosexual and same-sex relationships. Sometimes, a victim might unknowingly be given alcohol or "date rape" drugs like Rohypnol. Date rape drugs are often slipped into a victim's drink while a person is in a social setting such as a club or party. These drugs, as well as alcohol, can make a person unable to resist assault, and have a type of amnesia so she is uncertain about what happened. The victim is then left to deal with the trauma of the sexual assault and the uncertainty surrounding the specifics of the crime. Unfortunately, most cases of dating violence are not reported to the police. See our Date Rape Drugs FAQ for more information.

Violence against women by anyone is always wrong, whether the abuser is someone you date; a current or past spouse, boyfriend, or girlfriend; a family member; an acquaintance; or a stranger. You are not at fault. You did not cause the abuse to occur, and you are not responsible for the violent behavior of someone else.

If you or someone you know has been the victim of dating violence, seek help from other family members and friends or community organizations. Reach out for support or counseling. Talk with a health care provider, especially if you have been physically hurt. Learn how to minimize your risk of becoming a victim of dating violence before you find yourself in an uncomfortable or threatening situation. And, learn about how to get help for sexual assault and abuse. Another important part of getting help is, knowing if you are in an abusive relationship. There are clear signs to help you know if you are being abused.

If you're a victim of violence at the hands of someone you know or love or you
are recovering from an assault by a stranger, you are not alone.


To get immediate help and support
Call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)
or the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-656-4673.

Above information obtained from, http://www.4woman.gov/

Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence

DAP
Domestic Abuse Project of Delaware County
Community Hospital, 1st Floor
2600 West Ninth Street, Chester, PA 19013
(610) 497-6737           Fax. (610) 497-5778

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